Digoxin

Digoxin: A cardiotonic glycoside obtained mainly from Digitalis lanata; it consists of three sugars and the aglycone Digoxigenin. Digoxin has positive inotropic and negative chronotropic activity. It is used to control ventricular rate in Atrial Fibrillation and in the management of congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation. Its use in congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is less certain. The margin between toxic and therapeutic doses is small. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p666)1

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Digoxin: A cardiac glycoside. Digoxin inhibits the sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) pump, thereby increasing intracellular calcium and enhancing cardiac contractility. This agent also acts directly on the atrioventricular node to suppress conduction, thereby slowing conduction velocity. Apparently due to its effects on intracellular calcium concentrations, digoxin induces apoptosis of tumor cells via a pathway involving mitochondrial cytochrome c and caspases 8 and 3. (NCI04)2

Categories for Digoxin

Category of Digoxin:

  • Saponin
  • Cardiotonic Agent
3

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References

  1. Source: MeSH (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
  2. Source: NCI Thesaurus
  3. ibid.

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