Clinical Features of Headache

A headache may feel like a pain in the brain, but itís not. The brain itself lacks pain-sensitive nerve cells. Instead, most headaches originate in the network of nerves and nerve-rich muscles and blood vessels that surround your head, neck and face. These pain-sensitive nerve cells can be activated by stress, muscle tension, enlarged blood vessels and other triggers. Once stimulated, the nerve cells transmit messages to the brain, causing you to feel pain.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)1

   •   •   •

Back to: « Headache

   •   •   •

Headaches are very common. There is a wide variation in the type of pain you could experience with a headache, and how long it may last.

Source: New Zealand Health2

   •   •   •

A headache may feel like a pain inside your brain, but itís not. Most headaches begin in the many nerves of the muscles and blood vessels that surround your head, neck, and face. These pain-sensing nerves can be set off by stress, muscle tension, enlarged blood vessels, and other triggers. Once activated, the nerves send messages to the brain, and it can feel like the pain is coming from deep within your head.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)3

   •   •   •

References

  1. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ 2008/ June/ docs/ 01features_02.htm
  2. Source: New Zealand Health: health.govt.nz/ your-health/ conditions-and-treatments/ diseases-and-illnesses/ headache
  3. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ mar2014/ feature2

   •   •   •

Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.