Dizziness: Overview

Dizziness is a balance symptom (and/or circulatory symptom) where a person feels unsteady or faint. They may feel disoriented and unbalanced. It must be distinguished from similar symptoms such as giddiness, lightheadedness, faintness, and vertigo. Dizziness differs from vertigo, which is the more severe sensation of moving up-and-down or that the room is spinning.

There are many possible causes of dizziness ranging from minor problems (e.g. motion sickness, alcohol intoxication, etc.) to extremely severe disorders of the heart and lungs (causing inadequate blood oxygenation).

Ear disorders such as an ear infection can cause dizziness. Meniereís Disease is a chronic ear disorder causing episodic dizziness and vertigo.

Low blood pressure disorders can cause dizziness and fainting. Psychological causes of dizziness include anxiety and panic attacks (hyperventilation). There are many other possible causes.

Dizziness can be a medical emergency, as it may indicate brain conditions such as stroke. Seek immediate professional diagnosis of any dizziness symptoms.

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Back to: « Dizziness

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It is hard to define dizziness, since feeling dizzy is such a subjective experience. Some people describe it as a sensation of light-headedness or feeling faint, while others say it feels like they are suddenly unsteady (as if the floor is moving beneath their feet).† A wide range of conditions and diseases can cause dizziness.

Source: Queensland Health1

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Occasional attacks of dizziness are normal, but dizziness can have serious causes - find out what to do if you have dizzy spells.

Source: New Zealand Health2

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If you or a family member is experiencing dizziness, youíre likely to be feeling faint, light-headed or unsteady.

Occasional attacks of dizziness are normal. However, there are serious causes of dizziness, so itís important to see your doctor if you keep getting dizzy spells. Treatment will depend on the cause of your dizziness.

Source: New Zealand Health3

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Dizziness

It's common to sometimes feel dizzy, lightheaded or off-balance, and it's not usually serious. See a GP if you're worried.

Source: NHS Choices UK4

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When you're dizzy, you may feel lightheaded or lose your balance. If you feel that the room is spinning, you have vertigo.

A sudden drop in blood pressure or being dehydrated can make you dizzy. Many people feel lightheaded if they get up too quickly from sitting or lying down.

Dizziness usually gets better by itself or is easily treated. However, it can be a symptom of other disorders. Medicines may cause dizziness, or problems with your ear. Motion sickness can also make you dizzy. There are many other causes.

If you are dizzy often, you should see your health care provider to find the cause.

Source: MedLinePlus (NIH)5

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Most people feel dizzy now and then. Kids, like adults, may occasionally feel lightheaded or unsteady. But if such feelings repeat or interfere with everyday life, it could be a sign of a balance disorder.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)6

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Dizziness: A sensation of lightheadedness, unsteadiness, turning, spinning or rocking.7

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Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.8

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Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.9

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Dizziness is a neurological and physiological symptom characterized by a sensation of unsteadiness accompanied by a feeling of movement within the head.10

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Dizziness adverse event: A sensory capability adverse event that has an outcome of dizziness11

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References

  1. Source: Queensland Health: conditions.health.qld.gov.au/ HealthCondition/ condition/ 6/ 80/ 291/ dizziness
  2. Source: New Zealand Health: health.govt.nz/ your-health/ conditions-and-treatments/ diseases-and-illnesses
  3. Source: New Zealand Health: health.govt.nz/ your-health/ conditions-and-treatments/ diseases-and-illnesses/ dizziness
  4. Source: NHS Choices UK: nhs.uk/ conditions/ dizziness/ 
  5. Source: MedLinePlus (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ dizzinessandvertigo.html
  6. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ mar2016/ feature2
  7. Source: NCI Thesaurus
  8. Source: MeSH (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
  9. Source: Monarch Initiative
  10. Source: SYMP Ontology
  11. Source: OAE Ontology

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.