Deaths and Heart Disease

Deaths: Heart Disease

Diseases of the heart and circulatory system are the largest single cause of death in the EU, accounting for about 2 million deaths in the European Union, as well as being responsible for the largest number of premature deaths before the age of 75 years.

Source: EC (EU)1

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Back to: « Heart Disease

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Each day, approximately 2,200 people die from cardiovascular disease—that's more than 800,000 Americans each year, or 1 in every 3 deaths.

Source: CDC Features2

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Heart Disease Facts

  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. More than half of the deaths due to heart disease in 2009 were in men.[1]
  • About 610,000 Americans die from heart disease each year—that’s 1 in every 4 deaths.[1]
  • Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease, killing about 365,000 people in 2014.[1]
  • In the United States, someone has a heart attack every 42 seconds. Each minute, someone in the United States dies from a heart disease-related event.[2]
  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people of most racial/ethnic groups in the United States, including African Americans, Hispanics, and whites. For Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders and American Indians or Alaska Natives, heart disease is second only to cancer.[3]

Source: CDC DHDSP3

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Heart Disease Facts in Men

  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men in the United States, killing 321,000 men in 2013—that’s 1 in every 4 male deaths.1
  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men of most racial/ethnic groups in the United States, including African Americans, American Indians or Alaska Natives, Hispanics, and whites. For Asian American or Pacific Islander men, heart disease is second only to cancer.[2]

Source: CDC DHDSP4

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Facts on Women and Heart Disease

  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States, killing 289,758 women in 2013—that’s about 1 in every 4 female deaths.[1]
  • Although heart disease is sometimes thought of as a "man's disease," around the same number of women and men die each year of heart disease in the United States. Despite increases in awareness over the past decade, only 54% of women recognize that heart disease is their number 1 killer.[2]
  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for African American and white women in the United States. Among Hispanic women, heart disease and cancer cause roughly the same number of deaths each year. For American Indian or Alaska Native and Asian or Pacific Islander women, heart disease is second only to cancer.[3]

Source: CDC DHDSP5

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Coronary heart disease is a leading cause of death for both males and females in Queensland, but males are often hospitalised with heart disease at a younger age and have a higher death rate than women.

Source: Queensland Government6

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Awareness among women about their No. 1 killer is increasing.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for American women, a fact that just a few years ago, most women did not know.

Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH)7

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References

  1. Source: EC (EU): ec.europa.eu/ health/ major_chronic_diseases/ diseases/ cardiovascular_en
  2. Source: CDC Features: cdc.gov/ features/ AfricanAmericanHistory/ index.html
  3. Source: CDC DHDSP: cdc.gov/ dhdsp/ data_statistics/ fact_sheets/ fs_heart_disease.htm
  4. Source: CDC DHDSP: cdc.gov/ dhdsp/ data_statistics/ fact_sheets/ fs_men_heart.htm
  5. Source: CDC DHDSP: cdc.gov/ dhdsp/ data_statistics/ fact_sheets/ fs_women_heart.htm
  6. Source: Queensland Government: qld.gov.au/ health/ staying-healthy/ men-women/ men/ heart
  7. Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ magazine/ issues/ winter14/ articles/ winter14pg20.html

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.