Statistics for Diabetes

Statistics About Diabetes

  • About 20.8 million people in the United States have diabetes.
  • Type 2 diabetes, by far the most common form, is closely linked to obesity and is increasing in all age and ethnic groups in the United States.
  • Prediabetes, a condition that often leads to type 2 diabetes, affects 40% of Americans ages 40 to 74, or 41 million people.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)1

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Back to: « Diabetes

Prevalence Rates of Diabetes

The rate of DM continues to increase both in the United States5, 6 and throughout the world.7 Due to the steady rise in the number of persons with DM, and possibly earlier onset of type 2 DM, there is growing concern about:

The possibility of substantial increases in diabetes-related complications

  • The possibility that the increase in the number of persons with DM and the complexity of their care might overwhelm existing health care systems
  • The need to take advantage of recent discoveries on the individual and societal benefits of improved diabetes management and prevention by bringing life-saving discoveries into wider practice
  • The clear need to complement improved diabetes management strategies with efforts in primary prevention among those at risk for developing DM

Source: Healthy People (DHHS)2

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In 2012, 1.7 million Americans ages 20 and older were newly diagnosed with diabetes. “That’s not good, but it’s actually less than the 1.9 million new cases we had in 2010,” Nathan says. “It may just be that we are turning the corner a little bit.”

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)3

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More than 1 in 10 adults over age 20 has diabetes, but about 40% of them don’t know they have the disease, according to a large national survey. In addition, nearly 1 in 3 adults has pre-diabetes.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)4

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By comparing data from the 2 time periods, scientists found that the percentage of people with diabetes rose from about 5% in 1988-1994 to nearly 8% a decade later. By 2006 more than 40% of adults had either diabetes or pre-diabetes.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)5

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes is now estimated to affect 25.8 million Americans, or 8.3% of the population. Seven million of these people are undiagnosed.1

Source: NICHD (NIH)6

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The prevalence of diabetes is rising globally, and the number affected is expected to double by 2030. The prevalence and complications can be reduced through early and appropriate intervention. Within Europe, important differences between potential risk factors (lifestyle, environmental factors, genetic predisposition, etc.) exist.

Source: EC (EU)7

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Prevalence estimates of diabetes mellitus in Europe

According to IDF data, the absolute number of diabetics in the EU-27 will rise from approximately 33 million in 2010 to 38 million in 2030. In 2010, approximately 9% of the adult (20-79 years) EU-27 population was diabetic.

Source: EC (EU)8

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More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, or about 1 of every 11 people. [1] About 8 million of them don't know they have diabetes. Another 86 million—more than 1 in 3 Americans older than 20 years—have prediabetes, a condition in which a person's blood sugar is high, but not yet high enough to trigger diabetes.[2]

Source: CDC Features9

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As of 2014, 29.1 million people in the United States, or 9.3 percent of the population, have diabetes.

Source: NIDDK (NIH)10

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About 208,000 young people under 20 years of age have diagnosed diabetes. Most of them have type 1 diabetes.

Source: NIDDK (NIH)11

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How common is diabetes?

As of 2014, 29.1 million people in the United States, or 9.3 percent of the population, had diabetes. More than 1 in 4 of them didn’t know they had the disease. Diabetes affects 1 in 4 people over the age of 65. About 95 percent of cases in adults are type 2 diabetes.[1]

Source: NIDDK (NIH)12

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Diabetes affects an estimated 940,000 people, and about half of these are not aware they have the disease.

Source: Queensland Health13

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The prevalence of diabetes has been escalating over the last 3 decades, with rates tripling over this period—diabetes affected around 1.2 million people in 2014-15. Rates of diabetes are generally higher among males, the elderly, Indigenous Australians and people living in remote and socioeconomically disadvantaged areas. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, and is largely preventable by maintaining a healthy lifestyle

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare14

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An estimated 1.2 million (6%) Australian adults aged 18 years and over had diabetes in 2014-15, based on self-reported data, from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2014-15 National Health Survey. This includes people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and type unknown but excludes gestational diabetes.

Information based on self-reported data only is likely to underestimate the prevalence of diabetes as it cannot include people with undiagnosed diabetes. The ABS 2011-12 Australian Health Survey, which included both measured and self-report data showed that for every 4 adults with diagnosed diabetes, there was 1 who was undiagnosed.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare15

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The prevalence of diabetes (based on self-reported data) has tripled between 1989-90 and 2014-15. The proportion of people with diabetes has increased from 1.5% to 4.7%.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare16

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Inequalities

In 2014-15, the prevalence of diabetes (based on self-reported data) among adults was similar by remoteness and varied by socioeconomic disadvantage (Figure 2). Proportions were:

  • Similar between Major cities (6%), Inner regional (7%) and Outer regional and remote areas (7%).
  • Around twice as high in the lowest socioeconomic group (10% and 7% for men and women, respectively) as those in the highest socioeconomic group (4% each for men and women).

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare17

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Around 1 in 8 (13%) Indigenous Australian adults (46,200 people) had diabetes, based on self-report and measured data from the ABS 2012-13 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Measures Survey. Diabetes was more common in Indigenous females than males (25,900 and 20,300, respectively; or 56% and 44%).

Based on self-reported and measured results, Indigenous Australian adults were almost 4 times as likely to have diabetes as their non-Indigenous counterparts (18% compared with 5%, after adjusting for differences in the age structures between the populations).

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare18

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How common is diabetes?

There are over 240,000 people in New Zealand who have been diagnosed with diabetes (mostly type 2). It is thought there are another 100,000 people who have it but don’t know.

Source: New Zealand Health19

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The number of people with both types of diabetes is rising - especially obesity-related type 2 diabetes.

Source: New Zealand Health20

World Prevalence Rates of Diabetes

Worldwide estimates of the prevalence of diabetes are scarce and not accurate. A worldwide estimation was provided by a WHO report on estimates of the global prevalence of diabetes in the year 2000 (used in the WHO Global Burden of Disease Study) and projections for 2030.

The number of cases of diabetes worldwide in 2000 among adults (20 and over) is estimated to be 171 million. This figure is 11% higher than the previous estimate of 154 million. The higher prevalence is more likely to be explained by a combination of the inclusion of surveys reporting a higher prevalence of diabetes than was assumed previously and different data sources for some countries.

Source: EC (EU)21

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Has diabetes become a worldwide problem now, as more and more countries deal with changes in diet and growing obesity?

Rates of type 2 diabetes have grown around the world, particularly in the Middle East and Asia. In 2010, the CDC estimated nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes; in India, the number is at least twice that, and in China even greater.

Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH)22

Child Prevalence Rates of Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most common long-term diseases in school-age children. It affects about 200,000 young people nationwide.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)23

Undiagnosed Condition Stats for Diabetes

Seven million of these people are undiagnosed.1

Source: NICHD (NIH)24

Complication Statistics for Diabetes

Adults with diabetes are 2-5 times more likely than those without diabetes to develop cataract.

Source: NEI (NIH)25

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In adults, diabetes nearly doubles the risk of glaucoma.

Source: NEI (NIH)26

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Between 40 and 45 percent of Americans diagnosed with diabetes have some stage of diabetic retinopathy, although only about half are aware of it.

Source: NEI (NIH)27

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In 2014-15, there were 4,100 lower-limb amputations provided in hospital to patients with a diagnosis of diabetes. Lower-limb amputations were more common in males (75%) and for those aged 65 and over (57%).

Note that hospitalisation data presented here provides counts on the total number of in-hospital episodes for amputations, but cannot calculate the number of individuals undergoing amputation, the number of repeat amputations, nor establish the link between the amputation and diabetes.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare28

Death Statistics for Diabetes

About two-thirds of people with diabetes die of heart or blood vessel disease.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)29

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Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Statistics just released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that 20.8 million people—7% of the population—have diabetes, and over 6 million of them don’t even know they have it. Another 41 million people have prediabetes.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)30

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According to the Eurostat data on causes of death based on death certificates, 106,757 persons (46,141 men and 60,616 women) died from diabetes mellitus in the EU27 in 2009. Diabetes was recorded as the underlying cause of death in 2.2% of all deaths registered in 2009 in the EU27. There were more female than male deaths. However, the standard death rate in 2009 was 14.1 per 100,000 in males and 10.8 per 100,000 in females.

Source: EC (EU)31

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Diabetes contributed to 10% of all deaths in 2014, that is over 15,700 deaths, according to the AIHW National Mortality Database. Diabetes was the underlying cause of death in around 4,300 deaths (28% of diabetes deaths). It was an associated cause of death in a further 11,400 deaths (72% of diabetes deaths).

Diabetes is far more likely to be listed as an associated cause of death. This is because it is often not diabetes itself that leads directly to death but one of its complications that will be listed as the underlying cause of death on the death certificate. When diabetes is an associated cause of death, the conditions most commonly listed as the underlying cause of death were cancer, coronary heart disease and stroke.

Where diabetes was listed as the underlying and/or associated cause of death:

  • 5% were due to type 1 diabetes (829 deaths)
  • 54% were due to type 2 diabetes (8,400 deaths)
  • 41% were due to other diabetes (6,500 deaths).

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare32

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Trends

Diabetes death rates have remained relatively stable over the last two to three decades, both where diabetes is the underlying cause of death and where it is the underlying and/or associated cause of death:

  • On average, diabetes was the underlying cause of death in around 3,100 deaths per year between 1985 and 2014, equating to death rates of 17-22 deaths per 100,000 population for males and 13-15 per 100,000 for females (see data).
  • On average, diabetes was the underlying and/or associated cause of death in around 12,500 deaths per year between 1997 and 2014, equating to death rates of 67-78 per 100,000 for males and 41-49 per 100,000 for females (Figure 1).

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare33

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Age and sex

In 2014, diabetes death rates (as the underlying and/or associated cause):

  • Were overall 1.6 times as high for males than females (69 and 45 per 100,000 population). Age-specific rates for males were higher than females across all age groups (Figure 2).
  • Increased with age, with rates around 3 times as high in those aged 85 and over (1,503 and 1,165 per 100,000 for males and females) compared with those 75-84 years (608 and 394 per 100,000 for males and females) (Figure 2).

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare34

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Inequalities

Diabetes death rates (as the underlying and/or associated cause) increased with remoteness and socioeconomic disadvantage, and were higher among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people:

  • Twice as high in Remote and very remote areas compared with Major cities (101 compared with 52 per 100,000 population in 2012-14).  The gap in these death rates was higher for females than males?2.3 times as high in Remote and very remote areas than in Major cities for females (97 compared with 41 per 100,000) and 1.6 times as high for males (107 compared with 66 per 100,000) (Figure 3).
  • Twice as high in the lowest socioeconomic group compared with the highest socioeconomic group (75 compared with 37 per 100,000 in 2014). This gap was similar for males and females (Figure 3).
  • 4 times as high among Indigenous Australians compared with non-Indigenous Australians (234 compared with 55 deaths per 100,000, in 2012-14). This gap in death rates was higher for females than males?6 times as high for Indigenous females (236 compared with 43 per 100,000) and 3 times as high for Indigenous males (233 compared with 70 per 100,000) (Figure 3).

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare35

Cost Statistics for Diabetes

In addition to these human costs, the estimated total financial cost of DM in the United States in 2007 was $174 billion, which includes the costs of medical care, disability, and premature death.3

Source: Healthy People (DHHS)36

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Diabetes mellitus and its complications have become a major public health problem in all countries. It causes significant physical and psychological morbidity, disability and premature mortality among those affected and imposes a heavy financial burden on health services.

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There are 3 categories of costs associated with diabetes:

  • Directs costs: Diabetes is costly for the health care systems because of its chronic nature and particularly because of the gravity of its complications.
  • Indirect costs: Diabetes causes a loss of productivity because of disability, sick leave, early retirement and premature death. These costs are borne both by firms and by insurance companies. Indirect costs are often higher than direct costs. A similar survey made in Latin America shows that indirect costs are 5 times higher than direct costs. The same tendency was observed in the United States of America.
  • Intangible costs: Diabetes influences the quality of life of patients (suffering, anxiety, and discrimination sometimes). It can also affect their social life and their leisure time. Their mobility can also be reduced because of the disease.

Source: EC (EU)37

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In 2012, diabetes and its related complications accounted for $245 billion in total medical costs and lost work and wages. This figure is up from $174 billion in 2007.

Source: CDC Features38

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References

  1. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ 2005/ November2005/ docs/ 01features_01.htm
  2. Source: Healthy People (DHHS): healthypeople.gov/ 2020/ topics-objectives/ topic/ diabetes
  3. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ nov2014/ feature1
  4. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ 2009/ March/ capsules.htm
  5. ibid.
  6. Source: NICHD (NIH): nichd.nih.gov/ health/ topics/ diabetes/ conditioninfo/ Pages/ risk.aspx
  7. Source: EC (EU): ec.europa.eu/ health/ major_chronic_diseases/ diseases/ diabetes_en
  8. ibid.
  9. Source: CDC Features: cdc.gov/ features/ diabetes-heart-disease/ index.html
  10. Source: NIDDK (NIH): niddk.nih.gov/ health-information/ diabetes
  11. Source: NIDDK (NIH): niddk.nih.gov/ health-information/ health-communication-programs/ ndep/ living-with-diabetes/ youth-teens/ Pages/ index.aspx
  12. Source: NIDDK (NIH): niddk.nih.gov/ health-information/ diabetes/ overview/ what-is-diabetes
  13. Source: Queensland Health: conditions.health.qld.gov.au/ HealthCondition/ condition/ 8/ 77/ 286/ diabetes
  14. Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare: aihw.gov.au/ reports-statistics/ health-conditions-disability-deaths/ diabetes/ overview
  15. Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare: aihw.gov.au/ reports/ diabetes/ diabetes-compendium/ contents/ how-many-australians-have-diabetes
  16. ibid.
  17. ibid.
  18. ibid.
  19. Source: New Zealand Health: health.govt.nz/ your-health/ conditions-and-treatments/ diseases-and-illnesses/ diabetes
  20. ibid.
  21. Source: EC (EU): ec.europa.eu/ health/ major_chronic_diseases/ diseases/ diabetes_en
  22. Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ magazine/ issues/ fall12/ articles/ fall12pg14.html
  23. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ mar2011/ capsule2
  24. Source: NICHD (NIH): nichd.nih.gov/ health/ topics/ diabetes/ conditioninfo/ Pages/ risk.aspx
  25. Source: NEI (NIH): nei.nih.gov/ health/ diabetic/ retinopathy
  26. ibid.
  27. ibid.
  28. Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare: aihw.gov.au/ reports/ diabetes/ diabetes-compendium/ contents/ hospital-care-for-diabetes
  29. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ feb2012/ feature1
  30. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ 2005/ November2005/ docs/ 01features_01.htm
  31. Source: EC (EU): ec.europa.eu/ health/ major_chronic_diseases/ diseases/ diabetes_en
  32. Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare: aihw.gov.au/ reports/ diabetes/ diabetes-compendium/ contents/ deaths-from-diabetes
  33. ibid.
  34. ibid.
  35. ibid.
  36. Source: Healthy People (DHHS): healthypeople.gov/ 2020/ topics-objectives/ topic/ diabetes
  37. Source: EC (EU): ec.europa.eu/ health/ major_chronic_diseases/ diseases/ diabetes_en
  38. Source: CDC Features: cdc.gov/ features/ diabetesfactsheet/ index.html

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.