Brain injury: Overview

Brain injury is a traumatic injury to the brain inside the skull. Usually it arises due to concussion, such as from falls or sports injuries. Severe brain injury may also occur in car accidents, blunt force injury, or other head injuries.

Even mild brain injury can be serious. Concussion can lead to post-concussion syndrome. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) can also have lasting and serious symptoms. Failure to diagnose brain hemorrhage, such as subdural hematoma, or raised intracranial pressure (high ICP) can be dangerous and life-threatening.

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Back to: « Brain injury

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Traumatic brain injury (TBI), a form of acquired brain injury, occurs when a sudden trauma causes damage to the brain. TBI can result when the head suddenly and violently hits an object, or when an object pierces the skull and enters brain tissue. Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, moderate, or severe, depending on the extent of the damage to the brain. A person with a mild TBI may remain conscious or may experience a loss of consciousness for a few seconds or minutes. Other symptoms of mild TBI include headache, confusion, lightheadedness, dizziness, blurred vision or tired eyes, ringing in the ears, bad taste in the mouth, fatigue or lethargy, a change in sleep patterns, behavioral or mood changes, and trouble with memory, concentration, attention, or thinking. A person with a moderate or severe TBI may show these same symptoms, but may also have a headache that gets worse or does not go away, repeated vomiting or nausea, convulsions or seizures, an inability to awaken from sleep, dilation of one or both pupils of the eyes, slurred speech, weakness or numbness in the extremities, loss of coordination, and increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation.

Source: NINDS (NIH)1

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Brain Injury: Trauma to the brain.2

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Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also Brain Injuries, Chronic) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, Cerebellum, and Brain Stem. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with Diffuse Axonal Injury or Coma, Post-Traumatic. Localized injuries may be associated with Neurobehavioral Manifestations; Hemiparesis, or other focal neurologic deficits.3

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Brain injury: A brain injury AE, injury to the brain caused by an external force, that results in a brain adverse event4

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Brain injury: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.5

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References

  1. Source: NINDS (NIH): ninds.nih.gov/ disorders/ tbi/ tbi.htm
  2. Source: NCI Thesaurus
  3. Source: MeSH (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
  4. Source: OAE Ontology
  5. Source: Monarch Initiative

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.