Types of Ataxia

Types of ataxia include:

Specific subtypes include:



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Back to: « Ataxia

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Types of ataxia

There are many different types of ataxia, which can be divided into three broad categories:

Read more about the main types of ataxia.

Source: NHS Choices UK1

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Types

Some types of ataxia affect children from an early age, while other types may not develop until much later in adulthood.

Depending on the type of ataxia, the symptoms may stay the same, get progressively worse, or slowly improve.

Some of the main types of ataxia are described below. Read about the causes of ataxia for information about why these different types of ataxia develop.

Source: NHS Choices UK2

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Other types of ataxia

There are also a number of other types of ataxia that tend to have similar symptoms to those mentioned above. These include:

  • acquired ataxia - this can affect people of any age and usually develops very quickly over the course of a few days, or sometimes hours; it may improve over time, stay the same or get slowly worse
  • idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA) - this usually begins at around 50 years of age and gets slowly worse over time
  • ataxia with vitamin E deficiency - a similar condition to Friedreich's ataxia caused by problems with the body's ability to use vitamin E in the diet; it's often possible to control the symptoms with vitamin E supplements

Source: NHS Choices UK3

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Types of the condition may include:4 Types of Ataxia:


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Types of this condition:5 Types of Ataxia:


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Types of this condition may include:6

Types of ataxia:

  • CTCAE Grade 1 Ataxia
  • CTCAE Grade 2 Ataxia
  • CTCAE Grade 3 Ataxia
  • CTCAE Grade 4 Ataxia
  • CTCAE Grade 5 Ataxia

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Types may include:7

Specific Types of Ataxia

Friedreich's ataxia: Friedreich's ataxia

Friedreich's ataxia is the most common type of hereditary ataxia (caused by genes you've inherited). It's thought to affect at least 1 in every 50,000 people.

Source: NHS Choices UK8

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Friedreich's ataxia: Ataxia-telangiectasia

Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a rarer type of hereditary ataxia, affecting around 1 in every 100,000 children. Symptoms usually begin in early childhood, although they can sometimes develop later.

Source: NHS Choices UK9

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Spinocerebellar ataxia: Spinocerebellar ataxias

Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a group of hereditary ataxias that often don't begin until adulthood, affecting people from the age of 25 up to 80, depending on the type of SCA. Occasionally, some types of SCA begin in childhood.

Source: NHS Choices UK10

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Episodic ataxia: Episodic ataxia

Episodic ataxia is a rare and unusual type of hereditary ataxia where someone experiences episodes of ataxia, but the rest of the time they have no or only mild symptoms.

Source: NHS Choices UK11

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Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency - a similar condition to Friedreich's ataxia caused by problems with the body's ability to use vitamin E in the diet; it's often possible to control the symptoms with vitamin E supplements

Source: NHS Choices UK12

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References

  1. Source: NHS Choices UK: nhs.uk/ conditions/ Ataxia/ 
  2. Source: NHS Choices UK: nhs.uk/ conditions/ ataxia/ symptoms/ 
  3. ibid.
  4. Source: Human Phenotype Ontology
  5. Source: Monarch Initiative
  6. Source: NCI Thesaurus
  7. Source: MeSH (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
  8. Source: NHS Choices UK: nhs.uk/ conditions/ ataxia/ symptoms/ 
  9. ibid.
  10. ibid.
  11. ibid.
  12. ibid.

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.