Statistics for Asthma

Asthma and Health Disparities

  • Among racial groups, persons of multiple races (14.1%), black (11.2%), and American Indian or Alaska Native (9.4%) ancestries had higher asthma prevalence compared with white persons (7.7%) or persons of Asian background (5.2%).
  • Black persons had higher hospitalization rates and death rates due to asthma than white persons.
  • Among Hispanic groups, asthma prevalence was higher among persons of Puerto Rican (16.1%) than Mexican (5.4%) descent
  • Asthma prevalence was higher for groups with lower incomes.
  • 11.2% of persons with incomes less than 100% of the poverty level had asthma, compared to 8.5% of persons with incomes 100%-250% of the poverty level.
  • In 2012, the NHLBI joined several other NIH Institutes and other Federal agencies to implement a Coordinated Federal Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Asthma Disparities. The Action Plan presents a framework to maximize the use of existing federal resources to address the major public health challenge of asthma disparities during the next three to five years.
  • According to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, African-American children are about twice as likely as Caucasian children to have asthma.

Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH)1

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Back to: « Asthma

Prevalence Rates of Asthma

Currently in the United States, more than 23 million people6, 7 have asthma.

Source: Healthy People (DHHS)2

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In the United States, more than 25 million people are known to have asthma. About 7 million of these people are children.

Source: NHLBI (NIH)3

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More than 25 million Americans have asthma, including 7 million children.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)4

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Asthma is now the most common chronic disorder in childhood, affecting an estimated 6.2 million children under the age of 18.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)5

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Despite improvements in diagnosis and management, the prevalence of asthma has increased over the past 15 years. In the U.S. alone, 20.5 million people—6.7% of adults and 8.5% of children—have been diagnosed with asthma.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)6

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Asthma affects more than 5% of the population of the US, including children.

Source: NCBI, Genes and Disease (NCBI/NIH)7

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Asthma is Australia's most widespread chronic (long-term and persistent) health problem. It affects over 2 million Australians: 1 in 4 children, 1 in 7 teenagers and 1 in 10 adults.

Source: Queensland Health8

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Asthma is Australia's most widespread chronic (long-term and persistent) health problem. It affects over 2 million Australians: 1 in 4 children, 1 in 7 teenagers and 1 in 10 adults.

Source: Queensland Health9

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Asthma is now the most common chronic disorder in childhood. In the U.S., nearly 24 million people have asthma.

Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH)10

Death Statistics for Asthma

Asthma mortality is low and there is a tendency to decrease in most European countries. Although mortality is low, most asthma deaths result from acute exacerbations and are generally thought to be avoidable. Increases in asthma deaths, especially those persisting over a long period, thus raise concerns about the potential effects of changes in the medical management of asthma in addition to concerns about changes in asthma's underlying prevalence or severity. Death from asthma may thus be viewed as a sentinel health event.

Source: EC (EU)11

Cost Statistics for Asthma

Annual health care expenditures for asthma alone are estimated at $20.7 billion.9

Source: Healthy People (DHHS)12

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References

  1. Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ magazine/ issues/ fall13/ articles/ fall13pg15.html
  2. Source: Healthy People (DHHS): healthypeople.gov/ 2020/ topics-objectives/ topic/ respiratory-diseases
  3. Source: NHLBI (NIH): nhlbi.nih.gov/ health/ health-topics/ topics/ asthma
  4. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ jun2014/ feature1
  5. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ 2006/ July/ docs/ 01features_01.htm
  6. ibid.
  7. Source: NCBI, Genes and Disease (NCBI/NIH): ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ books/ NBK22181/ 
  8. Source: Queensland Health: conditions.health.qld.gov.au/ HealthCondition/ condition/ 8/ 29/ 9/ asthma
  9. Source: Queensland Health: conditions.health.qld.gov.au/ HealthCondition/ condition/ 15/ 29/ 9/ asthma
  10. Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ magazine/ issues/ fall17/ articles/ fall17pg26.html
  11. Source: EC (EU): ec.europa.eu/ health/ major_chronic_diseases/ diseases/ asthma_en
  12. Source: Healthy People (DHHS): healthypeople.gov/ 2020/ topics-objectives/ topic/ respiratory-diseases

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.