Asthma: General Information

Synonyms and Related Terms

Synonyms of Asthma:

  • Asthma
  • Bronchial asthma
  • Reactive airway disease
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Back to: « Asthma

Synonyms and Related Terms

Synonyms of asthma:

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Categories

Category of Asthma:

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Categories

Category of asthma:

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Categories

Category of asthma:

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Categories

Category of Asthma:

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Categories

Categories for Asthma may include:7 Category of Asthma:

Prevalence of Asthma

Currently in the United States, more than 23 million people6, 7 have asthma.

Source: Healthy People (DHHS)8

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In the United States, more than 25 million people are known to have asthma. About 7 million of these people are children.

Source: NHLBI (NIH)9

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More than 25 million Americans have asthma, including 7 million children.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)10

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Asthma is now the most common chronic disorder in childhood, affecting an estimated 6.2 million children under the age of 18.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)11

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Despite improvements in diagnosis and management, the prevalence of asthma has increased over the past 15 years. In the U.S. alone, 20.5 million people—6.7% of adults and 8.5% of children—have been diagnosed with asthma.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)12

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Asthma affects more than 5% of the population of the US, including children.

Source: NCBI, Genes and Disease (NCBI/NIH)13

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Asthma is Australia's most widespread chronic (long-term and persistent) health problem. It affects over 2 million Australians: 1 in 4 children, 1 in 7 teenagers and 1 in 10 adults.

Source: Queensland Health14

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Asthma is Australia's most widespread chronic (long-term and persistent) health problem. It affects over 2 million Australians: 1 in 4 children, 1 in 7 teenagers and 1 in 10 adults.

Source: Queensland Health15

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Asthma is now the most common chronic disorder in childhood. In the U.S., nearly 24 million people have asthma.

Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH)16

Onset Age of Asthma

Asthma affects people of all ages, but it most often starts during childhood.

Source: NHLBI (NIH)17

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Asthma is one of the most common causes of chronic (long-term) illness in children—and some symptoms appear more often in children than in adults. “Children have smaller airways, so if they have asthma, they tend to wheeze more often, particularly during the night,” says Dr. Robert Lemanske, Jr., a pediatric asthma expert at the University of Wisconsin.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)18

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Asthma often occurs early in life, but it can also occur for the first time in adulthood. Some patients can also “outgrow” asthma at first, but then develop symptoms again later in life.

Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH)19

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Asthma most often starts during childhood. Of the 24.6 million Americans affected, nearly seven million are children.

Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH)20

Gender and Asthma

Among children, more boys have asthma than girls. But among adults, more women have the disease than men.

Source: NHLBI (NIH)21

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Asthma occurs more often in women than men. Older adults, women, and African Americans are more likely to die due to asthma.

Source: CDC Features22

Race/Ethnicity and Asthma

Asthma and Health Disparities

  • Among racial groups, persons of multiple races (14.1%), black (11.2%), and American Indian or Alaska Native (9.4%) ancestries had higher asthma prevalence compared with white persons (7.7%) or persons of Asian background (5.2%).
  • Black persons had higher hospitalization rates and death rates due to asthma than white persons.
  • Among Hispanic groups, asthma prevalence was higher among persons of Puerto Rican (16.1%) than Mexican (5.4%) descent

Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH)23

Seasonality of Asthma

Asthma attacks among children increase in early autumn, leading to a sharp rise in asthma-related doctor visits and hospitalizations.

Source: NIAID (NIH)24

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References

  1. Source: Human Phenotype Ontology
  2. Source: Disease Ontology
  3. Source: Human Phenotype Ontology
  4. Source: Disease Ontology
  5. Source: Monarch Initiative
  6. Source: NCI Thesaurus
  7. Source: MeSH (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
  8. Source: Healthy People (DHHS): healthypeople.gov/ 2020/ topics-objectives/ topic/ respiratory-diseases
  9. Source: NHLBI (NIH): nhlbi.nih.gov/ health/ health-topics/ topics/ asthma
  10. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ jun2014/ feature1
  11. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ 2006/ July/ docs/ 01features_01.htm
  12. ibid.
  13. Source: NCBI, Genes and Disease (NCBI/NIH): ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ books/ NBK22181/ 
  14. Source: Queensland Health: conditions.health.qld.gov.au/ HealthCondition/ condition/ 8/ 29/ 9/ asthma
  15. Source: Queensland Health: conditions.health.qld.gov.au/ HealthCondition/ condition/ 15/ 29/ 9/ asthma
  16. Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ magazine/ issues/ fall17/ articles/ fall17pg26.html
  17. Source: NHLBI (NIH): nhlbi.nih.gov/ health/ health-topics/ topics/ asthma
  18. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ jun2014/ feature1
  19. Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ magazine/ issues/ fall17/ articles/ fall17pg26.html
  20. Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ magazine/ issues/ fall13/ articles/ fall13pg12-13.html
  21. Source: NHLBI (NIH): nhlbi.nih.gov/ health/ health-topics/ topics/ asthma/ atrisk
  22. Source: CDC Features: cdc.gov/ features/ 7things-womens-health/ index.html
  23. Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ magazine/ issues/ fall13/ articles/ fall13pg15.html
  24. Source: NIAID (NIH): niaid.nih.gov/ diseases-conditions/ co-infections-linked-child-asthma-and-cold-symptoms

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