Prevention of Allergies

Avoiding your allergy triggers is the best way to control your symptoms. But triggers aren’t always easy to identify. Notice when and where your symptoms occur. This can help you figure out the cause.

“Most people with allergies are sensitive to more than one allergen,” Salo explains. “Grass, weed, and tree pollens are the most common causes of outdoor allergies.” Pollen is often the source if your symptoms are seasonal. Indoor allergens usually trigger symptoms that last all year.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)1

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Back to: « Allergies

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Even when you know your triggers, avoiding allergens can be difficult. When pollen counts are high, stay inside with the windows closed and use the air conditioning. Avoid bringing pollen indoors. “If you go outside, wash your hair and clothing,” Salo says. Pets can also bring in pollen, so clean them too.

For indoor allergens, keep humidity levels low in the home to keep dust mites and mold under control. Avoid upholstered furniture and carpets because they harbor allergens. Wash your bedding in hot water, and vacuum the floors once a week.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)2

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While there’s no “magic bullet” to prevent allergies, experts recommend breast feeding early in life. “Breast milk is the least likely to trigger allergic reactions, it’s easy to digest, and it strengthens an infant’s immune system,” Salo says.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)3

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These findings highlight the importance of environmental exposures during the first year of life. Don’t smoke around your infants, and try to get rid of any mold in your house.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)4

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Prevention

Airborne Allergy

Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH)5

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If you have an allergy, you should avoid the thing you are allergic to, like by not eating or touching it.

Airborne allergens like pollen and dust mites can be especially hard to avoid. Go to Asthma and allergies for advice.

Cigarette smoke can make hay fever and asthma worse. Not smoking and not being around smokers can help.

Source: New Zealand Health6

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Preventing allergies from developing

There is no known way to prevent allergies - however, some research has shown that breastfed babies may be less likely to develop allergies and asthma. Children who live in smokefree homes are also less likely to develop asthma.

Source: New Zealand Health7

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Prevention

The best way to prevent an allergic reaction is to avoid the substance that you're allergic to, although this isn't always easy or practical.

Below is some practical advice that should help you avoid the most common allergens.

Source: NHS Choices UK8

Prevention of Allergies

Household Cleaning: The research showed that some simple steps—washing the bedding in hot water, putting allergen-impermeable covers on the pillows, box springs and mattresses, and vacuuming and steam-cleaning the carpets and upholstered furniture—can significantly reduce dust mite allergen levels,” Zeldin says.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)9

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References

  1. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ jun2016/ feature2
  2. ibid.
  3. ibid.
  4. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ 2006/ July/ docs/ 02capsules.htm
  5. Source: MedLinePlus Magazine (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ magazine/ issues/ spring15/ articles/ spring15pg26-27.html
  6. Source: New Zealand Health: health.govt.nz/ your-health/ conditions-and-treatments/ diseases-and-illnesses/ allergies
  7. ibid.
  8. Source: NHS Choices UK: nhs.uk/ conditions/ allergies/ prevention/ 
  9. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ 2006/ July/ docs/ 01features_01.htm

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.