Differential Diagnosis of ADHD

Differential Diagnosis for ADHD

Autism spectrum disorders: Diagnosing ASD in adults is not easy. In adults, some ASD symptoms can overlap with symptoms of other mental health disorders, such as schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, getting a correct diagnosis of ASD as an adult can help a person understand past difficulties, identify his or her strengths, and obtain the right kind of help.

Source: NIMH (NIH)1

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Back to: « ADHD

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Hearing Disorders: “We rely on normal hearing to pick up concepts and learn new words,” Moeller says. But a noisy classroom can be tough for kids who can’t hear well. “Children with undetected hearing loss may look like they have attention deficits. They may miss what they’ve been told because they’re just not hearing clearly,” Moeller says.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)2

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Vision Disorders: Some children with vision problems might seem to have attention difficulties, since eyestrain and headaches can make it hard to stay on task.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)3

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Learning disability: “ADHD can be confused with a learning problem,” Vitiello says. ADHD makes it difficult for a child to pay attention, stay focused, organize information, and finish tasks. This can interfere with schoolwork, home life, and friendships. But ADHD is not considered a learning disability. It requires its own treatments, which may include behavior therapy and medications.

Source: NIH News in Health (NIH)4

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Klinefelter syndrome: Although most boys with KS can understand what is being said to them, they might take longer to process multiple or complex sentences. In some cases, they might fidget or "tune out" because they take longer to process the information. It might also be difficult for KS males to concentrate in noisy settings. They might also be less able to understand a speaker's feelings from just speech alone.

Source: NICHD (NIH)5

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Absence epilepsy: Absence epilepsy is characterized by repeated seizures that cause momentary lapses of consciousness. However, these seizures may occur so frequently (in some cases up to 100 or more a day) that the person cannot concentrate in school or other situations.

Source: NINDS (NIH)6

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References

  1. Source: NIMH (NIH): nimh.nih.gov/ health/ topics/ autism-spectrum-disorders-asd/ index.shtml
  2. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ sep2012/ feature1
  3. ibid.
  4. Source: NIH News in Health (NIH): newsinhealth.nih.gov/ issue/ sep2016/ feature1
  5. Source: NICHD (NIH): nichd.nih.gov/ health/ topics/ klinefelter/ conditioninfo/ Pages/ symptoms.aspx
  6. Source: NINDS (NIH): ninds.nih.gov/ disorders/ epilepsy/ detail_epilepsy.htm

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.