Vitamin K

Vitamin K is a substance that our body needs to form clots and to stop bleeding. We get vitamin K from the food we eat. Some vitamin K is also made by the good bacteria that live in our intestines. Babies are born with very small amounts of vitamin K stored in their bodies, which can lead to serious bleeding problems if not supplemented.

Source: CDC NCBDDD1

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Vitamin K helps your body by making proteins for healthy bones and tissues. It also makes proteins for blood clotting. If you don't have enough vitamin K, you may bleed too much.

Newborns have very little vitamin K. They usually get a shot of vitamin K soon after they are born.

If you take blood thinners, you need to be careful about how much vitamin K you get. You also need to be careful about taking vitamin E supplements. Vitamin E can interfere with how vitamin K works in your body. Ask your health care provider for recommendations about these vitamins.

There are different types of vitamin K. Most people get vitamin K from plants such as green vegetables, and dark berries. Bacteria in your intestines also produce small amounts of another type of vitamin K.

Source: MedLinePlus (NIH)2

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Vitamin K: A lipid cofactor that is required for normal blood clotting. Several forms of vitamin K have been identified: Vitamin K 1 (phytomenadione) derived from plants, Vitamin K 2 (menaquinone) from bacteria, and synthetic naphthoquinone provitamins, Vitamin K 3 (menadione). Vitamin K 3 provitamins, after being alkylated in vivo, exhibit the antifibrinolytic activity of vitamin K. Green leafy vegetables, liver, cheese, butter, and egg yolk are good sources of vitamin K.3

Types

Types may include:4

Types of Vitamin K:

  • Acetomenaphthone
  • Menadiol
  • Menadiol Bis Dihydrogen Phosphate
  • Menadiol Sodium Diphosphate
  • Menadiol Sodium Sulfate
  • Menaquinone
  • Phytonadione

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References

  1. Source: CDC NCBDDD: cdc.gov/ ncbddd/ vitamink/ facts.html
  2. Source: MedLinePlus (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ vitamink.html
  3. Source: MeSH (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
  4. Source: NCI Thesaurus

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.