Vitamin E

Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin E is an antioxidant. It plays a role in your immune system and metabolic processes.

Good sources of vitamin E include

  • Vegetable oils
  • Margarine
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Leafy greens

Vitamin E is also added to foods like cereals. Most people get enough vitamin E from the foods they eat. People with certain disorders, such as liver diseases, cystic fibrosis, and Crohn's disease may need extra vitamin E.

Vitamin E supplements may be harmful for people who take blood thinners and other medicines. Check with your health care provider before taking the supplements.

NIH: National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements

Source: MedLinePlus (NIH)1

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Vitamin E: A generic descriptor for all Tocopherols and Tocotrienols that exhibit Alpha-Tocopherol activity. By virtue of the phenolic hydrogen on the 2H-1-benzopyran-6-ol nucleus, these compounds exhibit varying degree of antioxidant activity, depending on the site and number of methyl groups and the type of Isoprenoids.2

Types

Types may include:3

Types of Vitamin E:

  • Tocopherylhydroquinone
  • Tocopherylquinone

Anatomy Articles

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Related Disease and Condition Topics

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References

  1. Source: MedLinePlus (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ vitamine.html
  2. Source: MeSH (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
  3. Source: NCI Thesaurus
  4. Source: MedLinePlus (NIH): medlineplus.gov/ vitamine.html

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Note: This site is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. See your doctor or other qualified medical professional for all your medical needs.