SRY

SRY (which stands for sex-determining region Y gene) is found on the Y chromosome. In the cell, it binds to other DNA and in doing so distorts it dramatically out of shape. This alters the properties of the DNA and likely alters the expression of a number of genes, leading to testis formation. Most XX men who lack a Y chromosome do still have a copy of the SRY region on one of their X chromosomes. This copy accounts for their maleness. However, because the remainder of the Y chromosome is missing they frequently do not develop secondary sexual characteristics in the usual way.

Since human SRY is similar to SRY of mice, a model of SRY function has been developed in mice. This has been particularly important in discovering the interactions of SRY with other genes in male sex determination.

Source: NCBI, Genes and Disease (NCBI/NIH)1

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References

  1. Source: NCBI, Genes and Disease (NCBI/NIH): ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ books/ NBK22246/ 

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