Nephron

Nephron (NEF-rahn): A tiny part of the kidneys. Each kidney is made up of about 1 million nephrons, which are the working units of the kidneys, removing wastes and extra fluids from the blood.

Source: RDCRN (NCATS/NIH)1

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Each kidney is made up of about a million filtering units called nephrons. Each nephron filters a small amount of blood. The nephron includes a filter, called the glomerulus, and a tubule. The nephrons work through a two-step process. The glomerulus lets fluid and waste products pass through it; however, it prevents blood cells and large molecules, mostly proteins, from passing. The filtered fluid then passes through the tubule, which sends needed minerals back to the bloodstream and removes wastes. The final product becomes urine.

Source: NIDDK (NIH)2

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Nephrons: The functional units of the kidney, consisting of the glomerulus and the attached tubule.3

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References

  1. Source: RDCRN (NCATS/NIH): rarediseasesnetwork.org/ cms/ neptune/ Learn-More
  2. Source: NIDDK (NIH): niddk.nih.gov/ health-information/ health-topics/ Anatomy/ kidneys-how-they-work/ Pages/ anatomy.aspx
  3. Source: MeSH (U.S. National Library of Medicine)

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