Large intestine

Large Intestine. A long muscular tube that connects the small intestine with the anus. It is responsible for absorption of water from indigestible food.

Source: RDCRN (NCATS/NIH)1

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The large intestine is about 5 feet long in adults and absorbs water and any remaining nutrients from partially digested food passed from the small intestine. The large intestine then changes waste from liquid to a solid matter called stool. Stool passes from the colon to the rectum. The rectum is 6 to 8 inches long in adults and is located between the last part of the colonócalled the sigmoid colonóand the anus. The rectum stores stool prior to a bowel movement. During a bowel movement, the muscles of the rectal wall contract to move stool from the rectum to the anus, a 1-inch-long opening through which stool leaves the body.

Source: NIDDK (NIH)2

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Intestine, Large: A segment of the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract that includes the Cecum; the Colon; and the Rectum.3

Anatomical Information about Large intestine

The large intestine absorbs water from stool and changes it from a liquid to a solid form, which passes out of the body during a bowel movement. The large intestine measures about 5 feet and includes the

  • cecum, the first part of the large intestine, which is connected to the ileum
  • colon, the part of the large intestine extending from the cecum to the rectum
  • rectum, the lower end of the large intestine leading to the anus

Source: NIDDK (NIH)4

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What is the large intestine?

The large intestine is about 5 feet long in adults and absorbs water and any remaining nutrients from partially digested food passed from the small intestine. The large intestine then changes waste from liquid to a solid matter called stool.

Drawing of the digestive tract within an outline of the top half of a human body. The stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, small

The small intestine is the tube-shaped organ between the stomach and large intestine.

Source: NIDDK (NIH)5

Anatomy Articles

Read about these related anatomy topics:



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References

  1. Source: RDCRN (NCATS/NIH): rarediseasesnetwork.org/ cms/ cegir/ Learn-More/ Glossary
  2. Source: NIDDK (NIH): niddk.nih.gov/ health-information/ health-topics/ digestive-diseases/ anatomic-colon/ Pages/ facts.aspx
  3. Source: MeSH (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
  4. Source: NIDDK (NIH): niddk.nih.gov/ health-information/ digestive-diseases/ intestinal-pseudo-obstruction
  5. Source: NIDDK (NIH): niddk.nih.gov/ health-information/ digestive-diseases/ short-bowel-syndrome

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